Cold Fusion 101 at MIT

Cold Fusion 101 at MIT
January 7, 2013

A free, week-long course on cold fusion is scheduled as part of MIT’s Independent Activities Period, where professors are free to pursue areas of interest outside the regular academic curriculum. Professor Peter Hagelstein and Mitchell Swartz will be teaching “Cold Fusion 101: Introduction to Excess Power in Fleischmann-Pons Experiments” from January 22-30. Anyone can attend at no cost, and no advance registration is required.

The topics listed in the course description are:

Excess power production in the Fleischmann-Pons experiment; lack of confirmation in early negative experiments; theoretical problems and Huizenga’s three miracles; physical chemistry of PdD; electrochemistry of PdD; loading requirements on excess power production; the nuclear ash problem and He-4 observations; approaches to theory; screening in PdD; PdD as an energetic particle detector; constraints on the alpha energy from experiment; overview of theoretical approaches; coherent energy exchange between mismatched quantum systems; coherent x-rays in the Karabut experiment and interpretation; excess power in the NiH system; Piantelli experiment; prospects for a new small scale clean nuclear energy technology.

A similar session last year included a demonstration of Jet Energy’s NANOR device which showed a claimed energy gain of 1400 to 1600%+ output beyond input over a period of months.

I have been contacted by someone who will be attending the course and who has volunteered to send a report on the proceedings.


Below are responses copied from the cache made by Google after the site crash — the reply links won’t work

21 Responses to Cold Fusion 101 at MIT

rolando on January 8, 2013 at 12:31 am
Dr. Ben Heard is promoting nuclear fission on Australian ABC “Big Ideas “. I wish that he considers/knows LENR instead. Its disappointing that none of the speakers has mentioned CF as a part of energy picture.

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GreenWin on January 7, 2013 at 8:45 pm
The MIT CF team is courageous. They have fought all manner of negativity since 1989 and continue, to this day – kudos! As for MIT being receptive to Peter Hagelstein’s work, just alst year we hear the inside story of just how nasty these orthodox “scientists” can be:

http://e-catsite.com/2012/05/07/mit-physicist-nixes-cold-fusion-funding/

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georgehants on January 7, 2013 at 6:41 pm
LENR OUTLOOK 2013
I have dedicated to Cold Fusion then LENR then HHENI almost a third of my (professional) life time and therefore I am very dedicated to it and I have huge expectations for/from it. It is not necessary any mental effort for me to perform kind of personification of LENR and to wish it, at this New Year celebration, the classic:
http://egooutpeters.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/lenr-outlook-2013.html

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Adris on January 7, 2013 at 6:06 pm
Future prediction:
Cold Fusion Technology (CFT) will be used to fabricate a microchip powered by CFT and will be planted under the skin of every person ( on the right hand or forehead)- This microchip will carry all the personal information and will be used as a credit card , no money will be in the pocket any more -no one will be able to buy or sell any thing without this chip. Even every person’s location on the earth will be detected by advanced GPS system.
A terrible time for humanity is comming ahead.

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Zaghlool on January 7, 2013 at 6:18 pm
Well, that bloody prediction needs at least 20-30 years to be fulfilled.
Fortunately I will not be in this world and see that bloody things by that time.

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artefact on January 7, 2013 at 6:47 pm
Cold fusion is totaly not necessary for that application.
All the technology for that exists allready today.
There is no need for energy produced in the chip. It can be harnessed from the movement of the body, it can be induced by terminals while reading/writing to the chip (like RFID) or by electricity from the body itself.
But one can use CF for things that really consumes energy like robots(!), robot skeleton for disabled persons, mobile devices which will not need battery change/external reload any more (if a CF-device with electricity generation can be scaled down that much)

There is no need to worry about your idea in the context of cold fusion. But of course one should be worried about monitoring in general which is a different story.

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Zaghlool on January 7, 2013 at 7:21 pm
Well, sure the future chip well much complicated than what we have today – it will be same as a small computer and definitely needs a power supply-CF Technology.

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artefact on January 7, 2013 at 8:08 pm
it does not need to be complex. It is enough if that chip has an ID, a clock, encryption/decryption code and other things like interfaces. All other complexity can and should be (for that example) stored centralised IMHO.

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GreenWin on January 7, 2013 at 8:37 pm
On the bright side, one might be able to make a nice cup of tea simply by balancing it on the forehead. It is a miraculous time.

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Hampus on January 7, 2013 at 11:07 pm
I don’t wanna have a body of flesh and blood. When cold fusions robots become common I want to put my mind inside one of does. This fleshy body is just so fragile.

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Zaghlool on January 8, 2013 at 12:20 am
Well, At death the fleshy body will return to the earth and you have another gloried body ,no flesh and blood any more , you will be able to move and fly any where same as the ghost – Don’t get scared of death, you will be much better.

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georgehants on January 7, 2013 at 6:05 pm
New Scientist
Light hits near infinite speed in silver-coated glass
07 January 2013 by Jeff Hecht
A nano-sized bar of glass encased in silver allows visible light to pass through at near infinite speed. The technique may spur advances in optical computing.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23050-light-hits-near-infinite-speed-in-silvercoated-glass.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|online-news

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Bernie Koppenhofer on January 7, 2013 at 4:32 pm
This has crossed the editors desk of at least 100 major science publications, “a course at MIT, Excess power production in the Fleischmann-Pons experiment”. I have not seen one article, what has happened to our science community?

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LCD on January 7, 2013 at 5:09 pm
it’s not the first time they’ve offered it. I think the hoopla involved has come and gone. It’s also an open course so the university can sort of disavow it in a sense.

MIT is still somewhat against CF and if you don’t believe it just ask Hagelstein.

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Gerrit on January 7, 2013 at 5:29 pm
no, it has not crossed anyone’s desk. Most science journalists will just look a what is published in Nature or Science and report about that.

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Pekka Janhunen on January 7, 2013 at 5:47 pm
True. Plus they react to press releases made by institutions if there is an underlying refereed paper, even if the journal is not N or S.

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GreenWin on January 7, 2013 at 8:38 pm
Orders Bernie. Orders.

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Jonas on January 7, 2013 at 3:38 pm
I suppose this is not an online event as well..?

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Gerrit on January 7, 2013 at 3:25 pm
most science journalists should visit this

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Owen on January 7, 2013 at 1:41 pm
Also worth noting: I haven’t heard any serious attack against their calorimetry or methodology. You’d think if there were flaws in the NANOR the nuclear scientists at MIT would shut this project down immediately. The fact it’s allowed to continue speaks volumes.

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Owen on January 7, 2013 at 1:37 pm
Wouldn’t it be nice if these classes grew in popularity and started attracting dozens and even hundreds of participants? And it’s at MIT, of all places.

  • Frank the WP layout still seems weird, like some background or style sheets missing ?

  • georgehants

    Mr Rossi says, can anybody tell me what is the position re. negative temperatures as reported.
    —-
    Andrea Rossi
    January 8th, 2013 at 8:42 AM
    Dear Karl-Henrik Malmqvist:
    I am sorry to have to answer to you that it is impossible to get temperature equal to 0°K, let alone below zero °K, as you surely will be able to understand going through a Physics manual; see also “Absolute Zero” on Wikipedia.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • artefact
  • Nixter

    Karl-Henrik Malmqvist relayed the below absolute science article information to Rossi yesterday, his reply is interesting.

    Andrea Rossi
    January 8th, 2013 at 8:42 AM

    Dear Karl-Henrik Malmqvist:
    I am sorry to have to answer to you that it is impossible to get temperatures equal to 0°K, let alone below zero °K, as you surely will be able to understand going through a Physics manual; see also “Absolute Zero” on Wikipedia.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

    Quite ironic.

    Wikipedia says Cold Fusion and LENR are junk science, all pro CF entries are deleted. “Absolute Zero” entry on Wikipedia could be wrong just as wrong as the Cold Fusion entries. I think Engineer Rossi suffers from the same affliction as his detractors.

  • b4FreeEnergy

    Dear Frank, mr. Administrator, everything ok? Weird that there suddenly are so much problems keeping this website up and running smoothly.

    No, I’m not paranoid, just wondering …

    There probably is not much we readers can do to be of any assistance?

    • georgehants

      b4FreeEnergy, great thought, there must be some website wizards on page.

    • admin

      Thanks for asking. I am getting along fine, but encountering a few unforseen technical problems as I try to keep the site going and prepare for the future.

  • georgehants

    From New Scientist
    Carcinogen levels soar in Canada’s tar sand lakes
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23057-carcinogen-levels-soar-in-canadas-tar-sand-lakes.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment