Sky 'To Be Dark' With Unmanned Aircraft?

I know that the subject of this site is cold fusion, but I sometimes take the liberty to discuss other issues and technologies that I consider to be significant, interesting and potentially disruptive, especially when contemplating them in combination with an LENR energy source. We have talked about 3D printing and robotics here recently — another related technology is that of drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

Drones are most commonly discussed these days in the context of anti-terrorism strikes in which unmanned aircraft are remotely guided to send missile strikes on enemy targets — but the field of unmanned aircraft is becoming much wider than just for military applications. UAVs are fast becoming popular with hobbyists, with small and cheap quadcopter kits becoming available, which can be controlled by sophisticated software on computers or mobile phones.

A March 17th New York Times article, “Domestic Drones on Patrol” discusses some of the recent developments in the field and points out some of the political, ethical and safety issues that policymakers will have to deal with as this technology inevitably expands. The US Federal Aviation Authority has charged the Congress to draft laws governing UAVs by 2015. The article discusses some applications of UAVs already in use, or in development: searching for missing persons, firefighting, crop inspection, cargo transportation, building inspection, etc.

One of the big concerns that people bring up about UAVs is the potential violation of peoples privacy.

One of the limitations on UAVs is the length of time they can stay in the air due to current power sources. Over time, with improved energy sources (LENR, better batteries or supercapacitors, or something else) we might be seeing some of these craft able to stay airborne for much longer.

So where does the future lie with this kind of technology? It’s really not possible to say, but I get the feeling that there are thousands of applications that these kinds of machines. I can imagine small drones painting houses, washing windows, servicing communications towers, being used as security guards, and countless other purposes. I can also see this technology being appealing to criminals — not to mention the military applications.

Here’s a fascinating video of some of some mini quadcopters in action. This demonstrated was done at the University of Pennsylvania.

It seems that the acceleration of technological development is continuing unabated. Chris Anderson, of San Diego-based online seller of UAV equipment 3D Robotics says, “The sky’s going to be dark with these things.” That’s not a very appealing thought. So are UAVs something to be worried or excited about? What useful applications can you envision for them? What should we be concerned about? With all the amazing technology being developed, what kind of future are we looking at?

  • Jim

    I don’t mind people knowing what I do, as long as I’m not liable to be arrested for it.

    The best security is in exposing everything.

    As privacy becomes an ever thinner tissue, laws based on archaic moralities will appear as both flagrantly oppressive and just plain silly.

    “You’ve got no privacy, get over it.” (Scott McNealy, CEO of Sun Microsystems)

    • GreenWin

      “The best security is in exposing everything.” I guess that would apply to government as well:

      “Therefore their [government’s] choice was to deny it, to hush it up. And create the National Security Act of 1947, which validated that deception and covered it up. And allowed the group to go underground… And we’ve been living with that for 50 years.”
      Edgar D. Mitchell, Sc.D, Captain U.S. Navy, NASA Astronaut, Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AAJ34_NMcI

    • clovis

      I agree Jim,
      And it looks like that if you are up to no good, you had better give it up, because we are watching, and listening, and i would give up a little security in order to break the strangle holt that the bad guys has at present, we are bound for a new world and it’s a good one, coming soon,–smile

  • GreenWin

    Seems like a solution for Fukushima – except that the radiation levels are so high it destroys the electronics. Also nano-bot swarms can be easily blown apart by natural or artificial winds, EMF pulse, coherent particle/photon beams, etc.

    Cool sci-fair gadgets. But this is what happens when quadcopters look for love in the wrong places: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQTLlKDCyR8

    • Peter Roe

      A camera platform seems to be the obvious first use for these gadgets, or possibly as a means of planting more permanent trackers or spying devices. Apart from harmless private uses like checking your roof or getting aerial pictures of the landscape, the most common use will inevitably be spying, as per the clip. Spying on citizens by police and govt. agencies will inevitably become uncontrolled, people will spy on other people, businesses will spy on competitors – nowhere will be private.

      Slightly heavier versions will of course be able to carry more sophisticated spying and monitoring equipment and also mount weapons, taking the potential threat to another level. As it is governments and govt. agencies that will be the main users of the technology, we can’t expect to see any controlling legislation (other than against private use, obviously).

      In countries that have been or are being disarmed, even of shotguns, there is an urgent need for some kind of EMP circuit board killer or signal blanketing device to allow private individuals to defend their privacy.

      • Iggy Dalrymple

        We need an EMP projector beam rifle.

        • Peter Roe

          Artificial ball lightning projector. Any bright kids out there looking for a school project?

          • GreenWin

            Or a decent pellet gun – available here in the United Stakes at your local Tar-get Store!

          • Peter Roe

            I still have a battered but accurate BSA airgun from my teenage years (it was secondhand and old even then!). It might come in useful again.

          • Iggy Dalrymple

            Mocking birds are noted for chasing and attacking hawks and blue-jays. Maybe we could train mocking birds to attack quadcopters (at least those with DHS insignia).

  • GreenWin

    “The best security is in exposing everything.” I guess that would apply to government as well:

    Therefore their [government’s] choice was to deny it, to hush it up. And create the National Security Act of 1947, which validated that deception and covered it up. And allowed the group to go underground… And we’ve been living with that for 50 years.”
    Edgar D. Mitchell, Sc.D, Captain U.S. Navy, NASA Astronaut, Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AAJ34_NMcI

  • Gerrit

    can you 3d print a quadcopter ?

    • artefact

      Just search for “quadcopter 3d print” on google.
      But you will need motors, screws and the electonics.

      • clovis

        1+

  • elasticbucket

    Maybe we could get a couple of zillion of these PV or other solar energy type driven devices to form an all encompassing shield to deflect uv, ir and save the planet from a global warming disaster? Don’t know what to do about the rocks though. 🙂

    • Peter Roe

      What a great idea! It almost seems a shame that there isn’t actually any global warming to save the planet from. (georgehants 10:04am) 🙂 Maybe we could have a fleet of CF powered copters permanently aloft, with big elasticated nets strung between them to catch the rocks? (Damn – I should have patented that one)

      • clovis

        1+

      • georgehants

        Ha.

  • Jonas

    I’m hoping delivery services will greatly improve and get faster. For us that live in ‘remote areas’ getting stuff delivered is usually a bit of a pain, and there are lots of people having it worse than I in that respect. Hopefully one wouldn’t even have to take the car to the supermarket for food in the near future, but just send your drone.

    This will, of course, also make suppliying food and medicine to war refugees and such much easier.

    But on the negative side, smuggling of drugs and weapons will become far too easy, especially initially when governments will, most likely, drag behind. I guess if we want – as I do – a new society with self-sufficiency and greatly lessened governmental control, you’d also have to understand that many people will not have the ability to act responsibly in regard to their own and others’ safety. Perhaps one of our greates challenges lies in educating – ‘maturing’ – people to these things soon to come our way (the drones, the 3D-printers, the home-food-growing a.s.o.).

    • clovis

      1+

  • yamal

    there’s a new article about cold fusion (rossi, cravens) in the italian business times. nothing new, really, and nothing actually investigated by the paper – but at least some more or less main stream media outlet looked at our little hobby. here’s the google translation:

    http://translate.google.de/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fit.ibtimes.com%2Farticles%2F44967%2F20130317%2Ffusione-fredda-lenr-fusione-fredda-per-auto-elettriche-andrea-rossi-cravens.htm

  • artefact

    I don’t know if it was mentioned before

    Cold Fusion Now:

    “During the last day, a reader found evidence of vote-buying from at least one of the contestants which, according to the organizers, disqualifies them. The two winners are not implicated in that vote-buying scheme.”
    http://coldfusionnow.org/crowdvoting-not-enough-for-lenuco/

    (picture inside..)

    • Gerrit

      terrible thing.

      Anyone can anonymously put any project he dislikes on this online voting “GetVotesOnline” page and thereby have it disqualified.

      terrible.

    • cx

      So did anything become of the SmartPwr vote surge that thursday. I still say they used a bot to vote. This no way to go from less than 20 votes to almost 700 that quick. The fact that it only had 22 likes is big red flag. 🙁 Did any1 who as for investigation get a reply.

      • Barry

        Hi Cx, I emailed Future Energy and listed your concerns. I’m hopeing the staff picks will include G. Miley. Lets cross our fingers.

  • robyn wyrick

    I think this is a real challenge, from a privacy POV – and in the U.S., from a Constitutional POV.

    The 4th Amendment states: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    As I read this, it is being violated currently in many places, both federally and in the states; by both Republicans and Democrats.

    I don’t see it getting better any time soon, but I do see pressure on the other side. The issuance of National Security Letters was stuck down last week. That helps a small bit. More importantly, numerous organizations are now fighting to restore the right of privacy.

    However, they are up against everything from the NSA, state police, the FBI, and Google Glass. The ubiquity of surveillance and sophistication of intrusive devices is completely out pacing statutory law – meanwhile the Constitution pretty clearly states that most of these invasions (warrentless wiretaps, ubiquitous data mining of public records, etc) are illegal under the Constitution.

    I honestly don’t know what *can* be done, because the tools of surveillance (like my cell phone, for instance) are things that individuals not only accept, but they ask for and pay money for.

    • Iggy Dalrymple

      The remedy lies in unmanned vigilante drones (seek & collide). Remotely stationed, solar-charged batteries, with self initiated launch.

      • Peter Roe

        Excellent idea! 🙂

      • Peter Roe

        Or maybe a paintball gun or crossbow modified to fire some kind of sabot ‘bolas’ to entangle the blades (cheaper).

    • GreenWin

      Well put Robyn. Peeping Toms are a creeping problem. The U.S. correction will come from a Supreme Court returning to its mandate to uphold Constitutional peeping-preventions, e.g. the Fourth Amendment. The dysfunctional elements of State surveillance dismantled will never be missed.

  • georgehants

    Andrea Rossi
    March 18th, 2013 at 2:02 PM
    Dear Bernie Koppenhofer:
    We never worked upon funding, our strategy has always been based upon making working plants with our own money and get the funding from the payments of the Customers. This has always been our policy, because I believe in my work.
    Warmest Regards,
    Andrea

    • Bernie Koppenhofer

      georgehants…this response bothered me a little, I sent him a follow up. All the activity Rossi has been referring to, has to cost a lot of money. It seems unrealistic to me that his only source of funding is his own private funds and profits from the sale of E-Cats. What do you think?

      • yamal

        he uses ‘we’, not ‘i’, so he may well mean to include the money of his licensees and (for later expenses) his unknown partner when he talks about ‘our own money’. i think if he meant his money without including license fees and his partner, he would have said ‘my own money’.

        • Peter Roe

          I seem to remember that license fees were supposed to go into some sort of escrow account, but pending exactly what event or other triggering factor, I’m not sure.

      • georgehants

        Bernie, things bother me with just about everything to do with any science.
        Can only say that it is a crazy situation that we still don’t know for sure that Rossi is legit, but like others here I stick my neck out and say again, I am still 99.9% sure Rossi has something substantial.
        This is based on intuition and maybe some Evidence but as with many other subjects until the fat lady sings I will give the benefit of the doubt.
        Rather be wrong than prejudge or deny or accuse unjustifiably.
        I am quite sure there is a Father Christmas somewhere. Ha.

      • georgehants

        Bernie, have replied, but waiting for moderation.
        O’dear what have I said.
        p.s. you have another reply from Mr. Rossi on his page.

      • Peter Roe

        The story is that Rossi put his personal assets on the line up to the point where he sold his first LT e-cat, then used the income from this to fund everything else up until he sold the hot cat IP. That seems possible, but we have seen a few hints that the story is rather more complicated than it has been made to appear (e.g., the presence of Prof. Michael Melich (DOD-USA) and other ‘connected’ US people on Rossi’s advisory board, and other comings and goings that seem to indicate that Rossi was never quite the ‘lone inventor’ he makes out).

        Also the whole ‘partner’ saga may yet turn out to be not what we currently believe it is. I think we may be in for a few surprises when the full story finally emerges (not for quite a while though, I think).

  • georgehants

    Oregon Company to Sell Drone Defense Technology to Public
    March 16, 2013
    Do you want to keep drones out of your backyard?
    An Oregon company says that it has developed and will soon start selling technology that disables unmanned aircraft.
    The company, called Domestic Drone Countermeasures, was founded in late February because some of its engineers see unmanned aerial vehicles—which are already being flown by law enforcement in some areas and could see wider commercial integration into American airspace by 2015—as unwanted eyes in the sky.
    http://www.infowars.com/oregon-company-to-sell-drone-defense-technology-to-public/

    • GreenWin

      They’ll do plenty of business. In the interim, a K-band radar gun (~$100) with tweaked output amp can potentially cripple FPV drones & bots at 500 yards.

  • George N

    I imagine that air space will be rented, especially in urban areas. I think most people would agree that it would be hard to stop this technology from advancing – but order will naturally occur and we will be able to adapt. Especially if we are able to get fully automated and quick logistics. Although if we really get free energy from cold fusion, I have read somewhere that most of our roads would go underground, which might be a better environment for mass autonomous logistics systems. Therefore there might not be any good reason for an unknown uav that’s flying over your house – so maybe most people will shoot them out of the sky, haha

  • LB

    Nice flying but iit Will be hard using iit outside the laboratory as the control of the copters is based on the images From the cameras om the walls

  • georgehants

    Andrea Rossi
    March 18th, 2013 at 5:07 PM
    Dear Julian Becker:
    I do not think I will be able to attend the Conference on Cold Fusion at the University of Missouri, but I wish the best success to all the organization guys and the attendants.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • georgehants
    • artefact

      🙂

  • georgehants

    No mention of Cold Fusion, just an administrative error I expect.
    —–
    Union of Concerned Scientists Expert to Testify at Kalamazoo Energy Forum
    Michigan Must Extend and Strengthen Its Clean Energy Policies
    KALAMAZOO, MICH. (March 18, 2013) – Union of Concerned Scientists’ Midwest Office Director Steve Frenkel will call for Governor Rick Snyder (R) and the legislature to extend and strengthen the state’s clean energy policies at the governor’s energy forum at Western Michigan University today.
    http://www.ucsusa.org/news/press_release/expert-testify-at-MI-energy-forum-0368.html

    • GreenWin

      The Union is apparently UNconcerned with real solutions.

  • Barry

    off topic- Got this email from Future Energy. Good work Cx.

    Hi Barry,
    We’re investigating SmartPwr. We will release the names of all 8 presenters shortly. Thanks for your support and we look forward to seeing you on the 4th.

    Best regards,
    Graham

    • georgehants

      🙂

    • Barry

      Cx pointed out the small number of likes beside Smartpwr. I looked up the tally and sent this to Future Energy-

      Glad to hear. As you probably already know the number of votes totaled:

      1) Photovoltaics: 834
      2) SmartPwrNet: 728
      3) Miley 693

      But the number of likes totaled:

      1) Photovoltaics: 1199
      2) SmartPwrNet: 25
      3) Miley 462

      Smartpwr also only had two comments both of which were asking for an investigation because of a rapid number of votes in a minutes time.

      I have to admit I would like to see LENUCO present. It would be one thing if they lost in all fairness, but this is not only big but very important and I would hate to see him bumped because of unethical voting. Thanks Graham, see you at MIT, Barry

      So lets not give up yet.

      • artefact

        A good mail and I’m looking forward to another great video at MIT from you 🙂

  • georgehants

    If scientists read this, is there a possibility we will start seeing main-line research of Cold Fusion and UFO’s.
    ——
    Scientific American
    How Skeptics Can Break the Cycle of False Beliefs
    Pluralistic ignorance and the last best hope on earth
    By Michael Shermer
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=how-skeptics-break-the-cycle-of-false-beliefs

    • GreenWin

      Shermer’s original title “Dictators and Diehards” speaks to his view of the few elite who attempt to co-opt knowledge. Skeptics of knowledge-monopolies (aka orthodoxy) have risen recently in support of mavericks like Rupert Sheldrake and Graham Hancock (censored by TED Talks.) It is encouraging to see the “code of silence” being exposed as pluralistic ignorance.

      Indeed, the thousands of citizens and scientists who doubt AGW, big pharma-medicine, baseload wind/solar, 911 fabrications, national security coverups, etc., labor under a cracking code of silence. Fortunately intelligence is expanding those cracks, as more men & women of integrity and moral fiber emerge.

  • Wes

    A Homeland Security nighmare. Break out the light sabers.