HP Believes It Has Solved Two Major 3D Printing Problems

HP Chairman Meg Whitman stated on Wednesday that the company believes it has solved two of the major challenges facing 3D printing — speed and quality. She released no details on how they have accomplished what would be a major step forward, but said that a ‘big technology announcement’ would be made in June when the company would show how they intend to deal with these issues.

More information can be found in this article from IT World.


  • bachcole

    HP is able to do this research because they scammed me personally out of so much money with their cheap printer expensive and frequent printer ink scam. I hate Meg Whitman.

    Just kidding. Sort of.

    • Omega Z

      Meg hasn’t been in charge all that long.
      However, I know what your saying. And not only HP.
      Printer history concerns me. Half way thru printing a new heart-
      Print head clogs.
      Run out of print medium.
      Electronics just die.
      And- That Model is over 90 days old. We don’t carry ink for it anymore nor fix & repair them. To Old.
      You need to buy the New Model. Better hurry. In 30 days the next model comes out. 🙂

      • bachcole

        And even Kodak tells us that they don’t do that, that they are so good, and they still do EXACTLY the same evil crap.

    • nightcreature3

      It must have been during the early days of the home printer, that low volume publishers started cutting their costs and enjoying greater flexibility by printing their own material. (Remember the dot matrix printers with typewriter-style ribbon?) But the exhorbitant printing-press charges were not destined to be lost forever. An evil scheme was soon cooked up where those printing-press charges were now presented to the user, in the form of ridiculously expensive ink.

      They rendered their price so uncompetitive that for a while there was a fledging enconomy in refurbished cartridges. However, I think I observed a trend where these secondary suppliers were bought off and their products sabotaged.

      The real shame of all this is that schoolchildren are forced to pay for the same expensive ink as those people who do it for business.

  • Omega Z

    Meg hasn’t been in charge all that long.
    However, I know what your saying. And not only HP.
    Printer history concerns me. Half way thru printing a new heart-
    Print head clogs.
    Run out of print medium.
    Electronics just die.
    And- That Model is over 90 days old. We don’t carry ink for it anymore nor fix & repair them. To Old.
    You need to buy the New Model. Better hurry. In 30 days the next model comes out. 🙂

  • nightcreature3

    It must have been during the early days of the home printer that low volume publishers started cutting their costs and enjoying greater flexibility by printing their own material. (Remember the dot matrix printers with typewriter-style ribbon?) But the exhorbitant printing press charges were not destined to be lost forever. An evil scheme was soon cooked up where those printing-press charges were now presented to the user, in the form of ridiculously expensive ink.

    They rendered their price so uncompetitive that for a while there was a fledging enconomy in refurbished cartridges. However, I think I observed a trend where these secondary suppliers were bought off and their products sabotaged.

    The real shame of all this is that schoolchildren are forced to pay for the same expensive ink as those people who do it for business.

  • Peter Shwartz

    Manufacturers and or retailers have accomplished an amazing feat, whereby the cost of a consumable (ink) is in scale, far greater than the high tec apparatus that consumes it, somewhat, by analogy, the aeroplane/fuel or the motor vehicle/fuel. Now the exciting part, 3D printing, will the relative print/printer ratio be held? 🙂