Solar Hydrogen Trends team visits SRI, McKubrev [Update: Chief Scientist’s Comments on Reactions]

There’s an article on Peswiki.com that reports that the Solar Hydrogen Trends team recently visited an investors conference at nonprofit research center SRI International in Menlo Park, California. While they were there they spent some time with Michael McKubre, director of SRI’s Energy Research Center. Solar Hydrogen Trends claim to have developed a method of producing large amounts of hydrogen from oxygen through an undisclosed system of physical and chemical processes that act on hydrogen bonds.

In an email to PESN’s Sterling Allan, SHT presidetJack Aganyan reports that he presented test results to McKubre for consideration. McKubre told Sterling Allan why at present he is not able to carry out testing of the SHT system which they claim produces large quantities of hydrogen very cheaply. The SHT team wants to use a large facility to test their reactors to handle the flow rate of hydrogen that they claim, but have had a difficult time securing a premises where they can do this. McKubre wrote the following to Allan:

Until I see the machine in operation and have a chance to run at least zero’th level checks, there is very little I can or should contribute publicly. I liked the guys. They seem honest and knowledgeable but acknowledge that they are concealing elements of the chemical reactions that occur inside the box. This is their right, and obviously if the third party tests are valid (as they seem to be) then something is happening well beyond chemistry. But I do not want to give the impression of “selling a pig in a poke” – especially a “poke” (box) I have not seen and watched operate.

As a clarification to your story SRI does have the capability of handling their hydrogen production at present rates but not at our Menlo Park (urban) facility. What they propose seems far more sensible at this point. Run a downscaled (or throttled) unit into a fuel cell and quantify the electricity out. This would immediately demonstrate practicality. Hydrogen is a bit like Excess Heat — hard to see, hard to store, and in the case of H2, potentially hazardous.

SRI has stringent policies about what kinds of research projects they can get involved in, and Mike McKubre will not enter into any testing agreement that does not meet those standards. It seems that SHT are looking for ways to gain credibility so they can raise funds — so far there are many unanswered questions. Perhaps the fuel cell idea that McKubre talks about would be a good way for them to demonstrate the amount of energy they claim to be producing from their system.

UPDATE: Here’s a link to a document in which CEO, founder and Chief Scientist Konstantin Balakiryan comments on the mechanisms he claims are behind the SHT reaction. I don’t think these are new statements to followers here, but I think it’s useful to have them all in one place.
http://kochari.info/2014/05/07/solar-hydrogen-trends-inc-s-chief-scientist-konstantin-balakiryan-reveals-the-secrets-of-the-hydrogen-reactor-symphony-7a/

  • rudyswiss .

    Why don’t they just fill a big balloon: if it goes up it must be hydrogen (or He), from the ballast you can calculate the volume, and the time to fill gives you the production rate. All not very accurate but spectacular and not easy to cheat. And measure the temperature to be sure it is not hot air.

    • good idea… even if it explodes.

      • Ivone

        Especially if it explodes. (smiles) That can’t be faked.

        But, more seriously, calculations show that a litre of water converted to hydrogen smoothly over 48 hours, can run a household on an electric generator at 20 kilowatts.

        • Ivone

          This technology, if it exists, ties in very well with Roger Shawyer’s heavy lifting version of the EmDrive, which needs liquid hydrogen to cool the thrusters so that they produce a ton per kilowatt. So if an EmDrive vehicle was to carry a Solar Hydrogen Trends product, a tank of water, a cryo liquefier, it would be up, up and away in a much better manner than Roger Bird’s balloon.

          • Ophelia Rump

            Don’t you have to replenish liquid hydrogen to cool things. Where I work we have a tanker truck refilling our LH tanks once a week.

            Wouldn’t that be like reintroducing fuel to the payload?

          • Ivone

            Yes, you do have to replenish liquid hydrogen to keep the thrusters cool. It is the only thing I don’t like about the heavy lift EmDrive. But to waste helium…

          • Ivone

            Shawyer considered LN (liquid nitrogen) because its easier to handle and doesn’t boil off, but the YBCO superconductors doesn’t produce a good “Q” factor, and doesn’t provide lift. So LH has to be used, in spite of the difficulty in handling.

          • Ophelia Rump

            Do you have any idea what the impediment is, which precludes recycling the coolant in a sealed system?

            Why can’t you recycle the LN in a refrigeration cycle?

          • Ivone

            In a July 31st NextBigfuture article about the EmDrive, what stopped research on using LN was that YBCO high temperature superconductivity wasn’t the same as low temperature superconductivity using niobium metal as the “Q” cavity. The “Q” effect worked with niobium, but not with YBCO. Niobium only becomes superconducting with LH. Niobium has good RF properties, but not YBCO. To quote, It is commonplace for a 1.3 GHz niobium SRF resonant cavity at 1.8
            Kelvin to obtain Q=5×10**10 [50 billion]. Such a very high Q resonator
            and its narrow bandwidth can then be exploited for a variety of
            applications. At present, none of the “high Tc” superconducting
            materials are suited for RF applications. Shortcomings of these
            materials arise due to their underlying physics as well as their bulk
            mechanical properties not being amenable to fabricating accelerator
            cavities.

          • Ivone

            The LN is easily recycled, but it can only create high temperature superconductivity which is useless for RF work. Believe me, when I realised this, I was very disappointed, for a whole lot of daydeaming about easily realised antigravity and space travel had to be thrown out of the window!

          • GreenWin

            If one of these things actually entered space, thrusters exposed to the vacuum could realize -100C cooling effect. If in a solar orbit rolling the craft to evenly radiate heat is fairly standard astronautics. It all sounds like good fun.

          • Ivone

            The rest of the craft would conduct heat to the thrusters. The necessary 18 – 20 kelvin would have to be aggressively maintained.

          • Ophelia Rump

            Is it possible to use Liquid Hydrogen in a closed loop refrigeration cycle?

          • US_Citizen71

            You can but due to it’s small molecular size it leaks out of most systems eventually.

          • Ophelia Rump

            My understanding is that it is extremely difficult to dump heat in space because of the vacuum.

          • Ivone

            Ophelia, what is your LH used for?

          • Ophelia Rump

            I never asked. It is best to lose the habit of making too many inquiries.

    • bachcole

      Now I can see it.

      • BroKeeper

        Me too. Roger Bird floating away in his E-Cat helium/hydrogen filled “beautiful, beautiful balloon” to the tune of ‘Up Up and Away’ by The 5th Fifth Dimensions.

    • Ophelia Rump

      Because it is difficult to insure against the possibility of becoming a public reenactment of the Hindenburg.

      • Ivone

        “Oh the humanity…the humanity!”

    • Pierre Ordinaire

      Why do we have to fill a balloon at atmospheric pressure? Why not connect the exhaust to a pump that will fill hidrogent tanks to many psi’s?

  • rudyswiss .

    Why don’t they just fill a big balloon: if it goes up it must be hydrogen (or He), from the ballast you can calculate the volume, and the time to fill gives you the production rate. All not very accurate but spectacular and not easy to cheat. And measure the temperature to be sure it is not hot air.

    • good idea… even if it explodes.

      • Ivone

        Especially if it explodes. (smiles) That can’t be faked.

        But, more seriously, calculations show that a litre of water converted to hydrogen smoothly over 48 hours, can run a household on an electric generator at 20 kilowatts.

        • Ivone

          This technology, if it exists, ties in very well with Roger Shawyer’s heavy lifting version of the EmDrive, which needs liquid hydrogen to cool the thrusters so that they produce a ton or 10 kiloNewtons of thrust per kilowatt. So if an EmDrive vehicle was to carry a Solar Hydrogen Trends product, a tank of water, a cryogenic liquefier, it would be up, up and away in a much better manner than Roger Bird’s balloon.

          • Ophelia Rump

            Don’t you have to replenish liquid hydrogen to cool things? Where I work we have a tanker truck refilling our LH tanks once a week.

            Wouldn’t that be like reintroducing fuel to the payload?

          • Ivone

            Yes, you do have to replenish liquid hydrogen to keep the thrusters cool. It is the only thing I don’t like about the heavy lift EmDrive. But to waste helium…

          • Ivone

            Shawyer considered LN (liquid nitrogen) because its easier to handle and doesn’t boil off, but the YBCO superconductors doesn’t produce a good “Q” factor, and doesn’t provide lift. So LH has to be used, in spite of the difficulty in handling.

          • Ophelia Rump

            Do you have any idea what the impediment is, which precludes recycling the coolant in a sealed system?

            Why can’t you recycle the LN in a refrigeration cycle?

          • Ivone

            In a July 31st NextBigfuture article about the EmDrive, what stopped research on using LN was that YBCO high temperature superconductivity wasn’t the same as low temperature superconductivity using niobium metal as the “Q” cavity. The “Q” effect worked with niobium, but not with YBCO. Niobium only becomes superconducting with LH. Niobium has good RF properties, but not YBCO. To quote, It is commonplace for a 1.3 GHz niobium SRF resonant cavity at 1.8
            Kelvin to obtain Q=5×10**10 [50 billion]. Such a very high Q resonator
            and its narrow bandwidth can then be exploited for a variety of
            applications. At present, none of the “high Tc” superconducting
            materials are suited for RF applications. Shortcomings of these
            materials arise due to their underlying physics as well as their bulk
            mechanical properties not being amenable to fabricating accelerator
            cavities.

          • Ivone

            The LN is easily recycled, but it can only create high temperature superconductivity which is useless for RF work. Believe me, when I realised this, I was very disappointed, for a whole lot of daydreaming about easily realised antigravity and space travel had to be thrown out of the window!

          • GreenWin

            If one of these things actually entered space, thrusters exposed to the vacuum could realize -100C cooling effect. If in a solar orbit rolling the craft to evenly radiate heat is fairly standard astronautics. It all sounds like good fun.

          • Ivone

            The rest of the craft would conduct heat to the thrusters. The necessary 18 – 20 kelvin would have to be aggressively maintained.

          • Ophelia Rump

            Is it possible to use Liquid Hydrogen in a closed loop refrigeration cycle?

            I think the answer is yes.

          • US_Citizen71

            You can but due to it’s small molecular size it leaks out of most systems eventually.

          • Ophelia Rump

            My understanding is that it is extremely difficult to dump heat in space because of the vacuum.

          • Broncobet

            No it isn’t . In space there are no clouds to reflect back the heat radiated in the infared part of the spectrum. All reactors in space use radiators. On earth at night heat is radiated at light speed then when a cloud comes by that heat is trapped and the temperature goes up 20 degrees instantly. On earth there is CO2,more importantly water, that prevents the infared energy reaching space. So yes, there is not much convection or conduction but radiating works very well,in space.BTW All energy used on earth must be radiated to space except for a little making up products. This is an excellent way for us to find aliens as no culture can work around this never broken law.

          • Ivone

            Ophelia, what is your LH used for?

          • Ophelia Rump

            I never asked. It is best to lose the habit of making too many inquiries.

    • bachcole

      Now I can see it.

      • Brokeeper

        Me too. Roger Bird floating away in his E-Cat helium/hydrogen filled “beautiful, beautiful balloon” to the tune of ‘Up Up and Away’ by The 5th Fifth Dimensions.

    • Ophelia Rump

      Because it is difficult to insure against the possibility of becoming a public reenactment of the Hindenburg.

      • Ivone

        “Oh the humanity…the humanity!”

    • Hope4Dbest

      Why do we have to fill a balloon at atmospheric pressure? Why not connect the exhaust to a pump that will fill hidrogent tanks to many psi’s?

  • Christopher Calder

    “We are open, transparent, we allow investors to conduct their own control tests. We believe all doubts will be over soon, and we will finally have American investors to be interested in our technology, as it is already happening with Chinese, Indians and Europeans.”

    This is great news. If I won the lottery, I would invest in this company.

    • Asterix

      “…allow investors to conduct their own control tests…”

      Did you get that? Invest, then test. I’d invest in the good Doctor’s surefire win-at-roulette scheme before I’d spend a penny on his “look, I can extract neutrons from oxygen and turn them into hydrogen with my magic box” one.

      • Christopher Calder

        I think they mean potential investors. It does sound too good to be true, but that fact does not mean that it actually is untrue. A 747 is too good to be true, but almost everyone has flown in one.

  • “We are open, transparent, we allow investors to conduct their own control tests. We believe all doubts will be over soon, and we will finally have American investors to be interested in our technology, as it is already happening with Chinese, Indians and Europeans.”

    This is great news. If I won the lottery, I would invest in this company.

    • Asterix

      “…allow investors to conduct their own control tests…”

      Did you get that? Invest, then test. I’d invest in the good Doctor’s surefire win-at-roulette scheme before I’d spend a penny on his “look, I can extract neutrons from oxygen and turn them into hydrogen with my magic box” one.

      • I think they mean potential investors. It does sound too good to be true, but that fact does not mean that it actually is untrue. A 747 is too good to be true, but almost everyone has flown in one.

        • Asterix

          The aerodynamics of a 747 are well-understood and verifiable. Put enough energy behind something and you can make a rock fly. A 747 that flies with no fuel input would indeed be something, however. Perhaps we should rig up a 747 with an SHT generator and a tank of water and invite the SHT principals to enjoy a round-the-world flight on it.

          The label of SRI should not be taken to mean anything in this context; after all, Robert Godes has been running his Brillouin boiler setup *at* SRI for a few years now. He claims essentially much the same thing for his setup that SHT does–that he can somehow take neutrons and convert them to heat, along with non-radioactive tritium. To date, in spite of licensing announcements and promises of funding, BEC hasn’t shown anything that responsible scientists at SRI agree is real.

          I’m certain that Mike McKubre’s heart is in the right place, but you shouldn’t take his statements as signifying anything more than intellectual curiosity. After all, he said much the same thing about the Rohner/Papp engine scam.

          • Ronzonni

            Out of curiosity, what is “non-radioactive tritium”? Last I looked, tritium was most definitely radioactive, emitting beta rays, and it had a half life of about 4500 years. While that is not toxic at a distance and does not go through even paper, if ingested in quantity, it most certainly can cause cancer and kill people.

            If Brillouin can make non-radiactive tritium, that will be an amazing accomplishment. And I’d like to buy some, LOL.

          • Asterix

            Just one of the silly claims made by Brillouin at one time. Citing tritium as one of the intermediate products in his “boiler” then, at a later time, stating that no radiation is produced.

          • tritium have a half life of 12 years.
            it is a betta emitter so dangerous only when eaten or breathed

            the dose that is observed in cold fusion is easily detected by very tiny for a living being.

            banana are mode dangerous

          • I agree with you about the Rohner/Papp scam. I have an intuitive lie detector test that works pretty well. The Papp people and the other group selling the noble gas engine failed that test. The Solar Hydrogen Trends spokesman, Jack Aganyan, passed my lie detector test 100%. I don’t base my hope of McKubre’s words. I base it on the three positive independent tests which I do not think could be faked with a hidden bottle of hydrogen gas because of space limitations. You cannot store that much hydrogen in a small container. I have not done the math, but I have seen how big the hydrogen bottles are in hydrogen powered cars, and they are very large. So where did all that hydrogen come from? The most logical answer is that they are really telling the truth. I also like the fact they claim the original discovery was completely accidental. They are not full of themselves. Intelligence brings humility.

          • Asterix

            You’re confusing gaseous hydrogen with hydrogen in any form. Say the box has a few pounds of metallic sodium in it. Pour on a bunch of water (which one claims can be the fuel) and what’s evolved in great quantities–with hardly any energy input at all?

            There are lots of ways to fool people. Let’s assume that we as observers have no control over what they’re doing. How shall we determine that they’re running a scam–or not?

            Personal lie detectors can’t really be depended upon. Keeley kept a whole barrel of respected scientists fooled until his death.

          • Broncobet

            Good point.

        • Ronzonni

          A 747 has a long and well understood evolution from things that were not too good to be true. This flies against what is known about natural science. Any idea about how the left-over neutrons after conversion of oxygen to hydrogen are disposed of harmlessly? Nobody flies with that regularly!

          It is also odd that the inventors have trouble with systems of measurement. They describe energy in watts/hour! And they have not corrected it.

          ” With only 500 watts/hour of input energy we produce 2,797 cubic feet or 79,098 liters per hour of hydrogen …”

          (on Sterling’s main SHT web page)

      • bachcole

        Is that like Nancy Pelosi telling us that we have to adopt Obamacare before we can read it and know what is it in?

  • Gerard McEk

    A fuel cell of that capacity is quite expensive and usually requires high purity H2. I would go for a gas adapted petrol motor/generator combination and show humanity that this can run forever with an excess of electricity: OVERUNITY! I do not understand they did not do this already.
    I hope they will succeed.

    • Ivone

      See my comments below.

  • Gerard McEk

    A fuel cell of that capacity is quite expensive and usually requires high purity H2. I would go for a gas adapted petrol motor/generator combination and show humanity that this can run forever with an excess of electricity: OVERUNITY! I do not understand they did not do this already.
    I hope they will succeed.

    • Ivone

      See my comments below.

  • Christopher Calder

    http://www.ecomotors.com/

    The EcoMotors International two cylinder boxer style engine can run on diesel, gasoline, ammonia, methane, or hydrogen gas. It is very compact and costs less to produce than an ordinary gasoline car engine because it has fewer parts. A big factory is already under construction in China to produce them. The first engine off the line will produce about 360 horsepower. You can power any automobile and most trucks and busses with that amount of horsepower, and the engine has tremendous torque. Smaller EcoMotors engines have already been designed. The EcoMotors engine is so compact that you could easily fit an appropriately sized Solar Hydrogen Trends reactor, which would be smaller than a toaster, a battery, an alternator, and the needed water supply all under the hood of a typical automobile. All the ingredients are there, and at low cost. A fuel cell is probably not needed in this case, but I am sure they would be used eventually, such as the inexpensive Bloom fuel cell. http://www.bloomenergy.com/fuel-cell/energy-server/

    • Omega Z

      Except for being clean, Bloom has never delivered on it’s promise of cheap or economical. Only a few entities use it for claims of green energy.
      With several new players in the field, maybe this will change. One of the bigger issues have been the ceramics not living up to expectations & manufacturing costs haven’t declined as planned.

  • http://www.ecomotors.com/

    The EcoMotors International two cylinder boxer style engine can run on diesel, gasoline, ammonia, methane, or hydrogen gas. It is very compact and costs less to produce than an ordinary gasoline car engine because it has fewer parts. A big factory is already under construction in China to produce them. The first engine off the line will produce about 360 horsepower. You can power any automobile and most trucks and busses with that amount of horsepower, and the engine has tremendous torque. Smaller EcoMotors engines have already been designed. The EcoMotors engine is so compact that you could easily fit an appropriately sized Solar Hydrogen Trends reactor, which would be smaller than a toaster, a battery, an alternator, and the needed water supply all under the hood of a typical automobile. All the ingredients are there, and at low cost. A fuel cell is probably not needed in this case, but I am sure they would be used eventually, such as the inexpensive Bloom fuel cell. http://www.bloomenergy.com/fuel-cell/energy-server/

    • bachcole

      Wow! Really nice find. Unfortunately for them, a lot of the technology is soon to become obsolete.

    • Omega Z

      Except for being clean, Bloom has never delivered on it’s promise of cheap or economical. Only a few entities use it for claims of green energy.
      With several new players in the field, maybe this will change. One of the bigger issues have been the ceramics not living up to expectations & manufacturing costs haven’t declined as planned.

      • Broncobet

        It’s not clean is it? I think that the CO2 gets released into the atmosphere.

  • bachcole

    SHT at this moment really is a BigFoot moment on steroids for me. BigFoot has thousands of sightings, some from very reliable people, but very poor physical evidence and it doesn’t fit in with theory at all. But I don’t really give a fig if BigFoot exists or not. Of course, it is very interesting and curious and packs a huge amount of “oh, gee whiz, wow” factor if it is true. But after the dust settles and the scientists re-adjust their theories, so what?

    But if SHT is real . . . . . WOW!!! It has really good confirmation from reliable people, but it just doesn’t make any sense theoretically, and it is too good to be true.

    I love practical epistemology, especially when it matters. SHT could be my favorite epistemological puzzle, right now. It is like a Zen koan. {Did I mention that I am very solidly ensconced on the fence with this one?} This is even better than BLP. The promise is better. The confirmation is better. And the unlikelihood is stronger.

    One way for SHT so end this Zen koan concerning their product is to simply start selling hydrogen. The fact that they aren’t does not look good for them. If they don’t start selling hydrogen soon, I got to say that I disbelieve them. It would not make any sense for them to not sell hydrogen.

    • Ophelia Rump

      I wonder if they could make a deal with BloomBox to collaborate on a fusion of the two technologies. They would be a perfect fit. The two products would become one perfect energy source.

      They could both prove the pilot plant they have built and make it profitable.
      Bloom would stand to benefit tremendously and so might be motivated to collaborate.
      It would allow SHT to prove the technology and target an existing market with near infinite growth potential, while instantly becoming profitable.
      How many Bloom Boxes could they power at once?

      Bloom could just ship some units to their site, and sell power to the grid. Even without customers the two companies could be come energy giants in short order.

      • Omega Z

        The Bloom-box actually has issue’s(Short Life-cycle) & is not very economical.
        Thus it’s limited roll out.
        However, Others are stepping into the field & with competition, maybe they will cure it’s ills & economic shortcomings.

        • Ophelia Rump

          Thank you for the update. The profitability would make it beyond economical. That seems like a great motivator for the Bloom side of a collaboration. The short life cycle sounds worrisome.

          They initially estimated that the units would have a 10-year life as long as the fuel-cell stacks were swapped out twice.

          From what I can find out the problem with the BloomBox is it’s reliance upon Scandia, or scandium oxide Sc2O3

          Global production of scandium is under 2,000 kilograms. Most of the 5,000 kilograms used annually is sourced from Soviet era stockpiles. At $ 2000 a Kilogram this technology has a supply problem.

          SHT should seek out the leaders in the fuel cell industry. They would all stand to benefit from a relationship. I would bet that SRI could introduce them to key players in the fuel cell industry. They are probably already making that happen.

          • GreenWin

            Excellent suggestion. The S Korean industrial giant Doosan has bought into the American fuel cell market by purchasing ClearEdge. A flow of pure h2 into a ClearEdge microCHP would be a remarkable proof of commercial potential. Doosan is also a player in LENR having bought Italy’s power company Ansaldo Energia, an early supporter of Rossi’s E-Cat.

            http://www.clearedgepower.com/didyouknow/insidethepurecellsystem/

          • Omega Z

            Without backtracking, I do believe ClearEdge is one of the new competitors targeting Bloom Energy. There aim is to deliver on Blooms original promise plus a little more.
            We’ll see what happens.

            They need to fix the issues of stack reliability & make the manufacturing cost improvements to do that. They could end up like Bloom. Spoke to soon.
            However, new people may find new ways & if they accomplish their goals, it would be a good match with SHT. If SHT has what’s claimed.

    • GreenWin

      I think BigFeet are “virtual” ETs. They pop in and out of human consciousness just to make the game more interesting. And controversial. It’s also good for ratings. Which is reason for Nike to be shopping a BigFoot endorsement deal.

      • bachcole

        I could agree with you more, but only a little. I believe that it is God’s play, for the exact same reason. (:->)

  • Curbina

    It would be certainly interesting to have this validated as Mr. McKubre suggests. Not holding my breath tho.

    • bachcole

      I have heard the rumor that Mike McKubre does NOT walk on water, but, until I get contradictory evidence, I don’t believe it for a second. If Mike McKubre pronounces SHT to be real or unreal, then for me the issue is resolved. He didn’t make any such pronouncement.

      • Ophelia Rump

        If I understood the subtleties of the language, he has set the ground rules.
        If they have a small scale prototype they can settle the matter easily.

        Could they have built such a thing to industrial scale without using any small scale testing? That would seem like an insanely expensive approach to prototyping, and therefore highly unlikely enough to be a very questionable practice.

        Mike McKubre was wise to set that ground-rule.

        • US_Citizen71

          For those who don’t understand the what is implied. A smaller scale device would limit the ability to hide chemicals other than what they claim is in use. But in their defense it takes what it takes. Transistors didn’t grow larger but smaller, Tesla’s patent for what was essentially a TEG was the size of a very large fire pit, so it is possible that they have built the smallest version of their device that works reliably with the tech that they have.

          I would love for their device to be real but the claim of radiation free fission of oxygen into hydrogen is just a bridge too far for me to cross at this time.

          • Ophelia Rump

            If you are correct in the belief that their process is at the current minimum scale, then options are limited.
            1 Find an onsite use for their production.
            2 Find a local customer for their product.
            3 Bring in experts in large scale hydrogen production to perform an independent validation.
            4 Move their plant.

            Maybe they could setup some of those open flame stacks used over natural gas wells to burn off the production, and perform a long term demonstration. Fuel cells would be a better sink.

          • bachcole

            I hear you, but we never really know.

        • Symphony 7 can be built to any size, smaller or larger than the current size 7A. All that is required is $$$ which is in short supply at the moment. This is where the investors come in.
          Solar Hydrogen Trends (I’m afraid to abbreviate since there are “minors” in the audience) has achieved the “impossible” on a budget that is ridiculously low and laughable for such an endeavor. The bulk of the money has been used for materials, equipment, and testing. The scientists and engineers have basically volunteered their time, knowledge, and skills for this “miraculous” achievement. And all this was accomplished at a garage level.
          Before you question their development practices, name a company that has achieved even 1% of what they have achieved with budgets that are 100 times more.
          Solar Hydrogen Trends did not have the luxury to play with small prototypes to prove the concept. They had only one shot to either make a working prototype or fail.
          It’s like questioning Noah’s competency for not making a small prototype before building the Arc.
          Regarding McKubre and his ground rules.
          The Golden Rule says “He who has the gold makes the rules”. When McKubre invests his money into making the prototypes then he can talk about rules. Solar Hydrogen Trends has no need to play by anybody else’s rules. They have a working reactor. SRI on the other hand with all that financing, state of the art labs, and pool of scientists does not have anything to show in Cold Fusion or LENR research. This is just my opinion.

          • I need to make a correction regarding the size of the reactor. My apologies.

            According to Solar Hydrogen Trends in the beginning there was a smaller version of the reactor. The larger version was made to prove the scalability of the technology, requested and funded with a grant by The Patricia Galloway and Kris Nielsen Foundation.
            Also, the Symphony reactor has gone through multiple iterations to improve the efficiency to the current level. 7A is the current version that has been demonstrated and documented with formal test reports.
            This mistake on my part shows that information can be degraded during transmission, but as long as there are mechanisms to check and verify the accuracy of data the information can be restored to it’s original state.

  • Ophelia Rump

    I wonder if they could make a deal with BloomBox to collaborate on a fusion of the two technologies. They would be a perfect fit. The two products would become one perfect energy source.

    • Omega Z

      The Bloom-box actually has issue’s(Short Life-cycle) & is not very economical.
      Thus it’s limited roll out.
      However, Others are stepping into the field & with competition, maybe they will cure it’s ills & economic shortcomings.

      • Ophelia Rump

        Thank you for the update. The profitability would make it beyond economical. That seems like a great motivator for the Bloom side of a collaboration. The short life cycle sounds worrisome.

        They initially estimated that the units would have a 10-year life as long as the fuel-cell stacks were swapped out twice.

        From what I can find out the problem with the BloomBox is it’s reliance upon Scandia, or scandium oxide Sc2O3

        Global production of scandium is under 2,000 kilograms. Most of the 5,000 kilograms used annually is sourced from Soviet era stockpiles. At $ 2000 a Kilogram this technology has a supply problem.

        • GreenWin

          Excellent suggestion. The S Korean industrial giant Doosan has bought into the American fuel cell market by purchasing ClearEdge. A flow of pure h2 into a ClearEdge microCHP would be a remarkable proof of commercial potential. Doosan is also a player in LENR having bought Italy’s power company Ansaldo Energia, an early supporter of Rossi’s E-Cat.

          http://www.clearedgepower.com/didyouknow/insidethepurecellsystem/

          • Omega Z

            Without backtracking, I do believe ClearEdge is one of the new competitors targeting Bloom Energy. There aim is to deliver on Blooms original promise plus a little more.
            We’ll see what happens.

            They need to fix the issues of stack reliability & make the manufacturing cost improvements to do that. They could end up like Bloom. Spoke to soon.
            However, new people may find new ways & if they accomplish their goals, it would be a good match with SHT. If SHT has what’s claimed.

  • GreenWin

    I think BigFeet are “virtual” ETs. They pop in and out of human consciousness just to make the game more interesting. And controversial. It’s also good for ratings. Which is reason for Nike to be shopping a BigFoot endorsement deal.

  • Private Citizen

    If the marketing genius required to name ones product “SHT” is equal to the engineering genius behind it, well then the validity is beyond question.

    That said, hire MFMP to do the testing in the open.

    • Brokeeper

      And some of us think the acronym “LENR” is a problem?

      • Curbina

        LOL BroKeeper, anyway, the issue with LENR is only about the “N” on it. Frankly I don’t really care too much about the N, but the worry is not mine but from many that would like to take a long distance from the current Nuclear industry.

        • Brokeeper

      • bachcole

        I’ve been thinking the same thing for weeks. I hope that it does turn out to be true, but I am leaning in that direction. The technical issues just seem insurmountable. I want Mike McKubre to verify it, then I will believe.

    • Curbina

      They called their “product” Symphony 7. SHT is the name of the company. That said, is clearly a very bad choice for a company’s name.

      • Anon2012_2014

        Brown 25 from Uranus Corporation.

        • Brokeeper

          IBM – Itty Bitty Machine Co.

      • The company name is not SHT.

        It’s Solar Hydrogen Trends, Inc. !!!

        I find it disturbing that on a technical forum like this there are so many individuals who lack basic critical thinking skills and etiquette .

        I would elaborate on this if I thought it would do any good. Maybe another time.

        For now I’ll just say that I’m disappointed !

        • Brokeeper

          The more safe hydrogen energy generated devices available the better we all will be. I do admire SHT’s contribution to this whether it is LENR related or not. So thank you mind2matter2reality for your loyal defense. My apology for any offense taken. Keep up the good work Bro.

          • No need for apology BroKeeper.
            We are all in this together independent of our current opinions and beliefs.
            History is being made and we are all part of it no matter which side of the fence we are standing.

        • Broncobet

          It’s a Russian joke.

  • Ronzonni

    Out of curiosity, what is “non-radioactive tritium”? Last I looked, tritium was most definitely radioactive, emitting beta rays, and it had a half life of about 4500 years. While that is not toxic at a distance and does not go through even paper, if ingested in quantity, it most certainly can cause cancer and kill people.

    If Brillouin can make non-radiactive tritium, that will be an amazing accomplishment. And I’d like to buy some, LOL.

    • tritium have a half life of 12 years.
      it is a betta emitter so dangerous only when eaten or breathed

      the dose that is observed in cold fusion is easily detected by very tiny for a living being.

      banana are mode dangerous

      • Broncobet

        Good point.

  • Pierre Ordinaire

    If the claims of SHT are true and reproducible, all the others are like mopeds next to a Rolls-Royce jet turbine.

  • Hope4Dbest

    If the claims of SHT are true and reproducible, all the others are like mopeds next to a Rolls-Royce jet turbine.

    • bachcole

      I tend to agree, even though I am emotionally involved with Rossi. But I am really have a lot of trouble with the science.

  • Anon2012_2014

    SHT = unknown money raiser.

    I trust McKubre to find the results. I do not trust SHT.

  • Anon2012_2014

    SHT = unknown money raiser.

    I trust McKubre to find the results. I do not trust SHT.

  • If you give all the money and wealth in the world to the best of the best companies in the world, they will not be able to create another Symphony 7A with 1300 X over-unity output (maybe for another 20 years).

    This accidentally discovered process is really a gift to mankind to undo the harm that it has brought upon itself and its environment.

    I know that most people have their doubts about the validity of the claims. I don’t blame them. But knowing the main team members of the company and their character I have no reason to suspect any foul play. I can say from my personal experience that they value their reputation above anything else and present only factual information about what they have achieved.

    For most of the members English is not the primary language and may be a cause for miscommunication sometimes. I would ask the community to be understanding of this fact and ask for clarification if something does not sound right or add up.

    On behalf of Solar Hydrogen Trends I would like to thank E-Cat World website and its active
    participants for regular coverage of SHT and the opinions of its members.

    • Curbina

      Many of us would be delighted to be shown by a respected and independent third party that Solar Hydrogen Trends really has what claims to have. But our skepticism is granted, Mr. Avetisian. You have to be aware that we are 25 years later discussing about if “Cold Fusion” is real or not, and this is a forum where many posters (including me) have been following the saga for all that time, and only a fraction of us is leaning to accept the possibility of LENR really being a breakthrough, while most still doubt it.

      That said, and as well built experiments with minimal and controlled sources of error are what can sway any skepticism, at this point I think that the fuel cell demonstration suggested by Mr. McKubre is really a good compromise of costs vs demostrative efficacy. Better if at some point the cell fuel is looped back to keep the Symphony 7 reactor going. I hope you can find an investor willing to finance such a trial. Perhaps if you design a good protocol, with the help of someone that would know how to minimize potential sources of error, and budget what would it cost to perform it, including the publication of a detailed technical report with all the data to be collected, then set up a crowdfunding initiative, you could get to make the demo that would change the perception. Is not easy, I really think that SHT is in a very complicate situation, in much regards similar to what Andrea Rossi had to undergo these last 5 years.

      Now, on a lighter topic, I know the owners of SHT are not native English speakers (nor do I) but due to the unfortunate resemblance of the SHT acronym to the well known 4 letter word, It would be advisable to perhaps perform a name change to the company?

      My Best Regards.

    • mind2matter2reality,

      There are rude people on almost all discussion groups. Just ignore them.

      If you are involved in the company, I have a question for you. The Solar Hydrogen Trends standard size reactor produces too much hydrogen for an automobile to use. Have you calculated the wattage input required to run a car sized reactor? If running your large reactor takes about 400 watts, it seems logical that a smaller reactor would use less power which could easily be supplied by an alternator and small battery. It would seem to me that hooking a reactor up to a vehicle with either an internal combustion engine or a fuel cell would be easy and could be accomplished in a matter of months, not years. Comments?

      • Hi Christopher,

        We generally ignore the rude people knowing well that the community at large recognizes their immaturity and ignores their comments as well.

        But sometimes they have to be given the taste of their own medicine to stop the spread of their disease.

        My involvement with the company so far has been through lengthy conversations with Jack Aganyan, the president, with whom I became very good friends recently.

        We have a lot in common and we share the same vision about hydrogen economy and the future of the world.

        I have already discussed the exact same question with Jack some time ago. Years ago I built a three wheeled vehicle from ground up. You can see it in a video submittal to Discovery Channel for a reality show called Top Engineer.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0q_Z0h2S-8k

        For many years I was looking for a different propulsion system in order to finish the project. I have considered a conversion to a rechargeable electric car but the conversion kits have been either not powerful enough or were too expensive.
        So I asked Jack if the reactor could be scaled down to fit on a car and run an IC engine.
        His response was that this and many other things are possible but to get there we need a proper lab and financing to continue the research and development.
        To this day they are still working from their backyards and garages and were able to achieve the results with their own financing. But there comes a point where it is not possible or practical to continue the same way.
        The length of development time for an on-board version largely depends on the availability of the lab and the amount of funds.
        So you can get in line behind me for the on-board hydrogen reactor. 🙂

        • Curbina

          Is crowdfunding a viable financing option for them?

    • Albert D. Kallal

      I also much commend the coverage. And as I stated, I 100% believe
      the claims of H output.

      What we don’t know is what other substances are being
      consumed here – I simply don’t believe the only input is electricity and water –
      there are other chemicals processes that are at play here and they are being
      consumed in this process. This in no way
      says this device is not an incredible breakthrough EVEN if additional chemicals
      are consumed/required.

      However, some additional transparency on this missing issue
      would go a LONG way for SHT to establish their credibility. If no additional chemicals
      are required/consumed for this H producing device, then it is truly a breakthrough
      in energy. And even much of the existing systems in place can use H (for example a furnace or stove with minor modifications can run on H). While many seem to think H production on site is the answer – such a system would spring forth a H producing industry and that of distributing the H produced to consumers.

      The output gases include elements that clearly are
      not JUST the result of splitting water based on the datasheet in SHT press
      release of 3rd party verification.

      They need to come clean in this issue either way – ie: Are
      additional chemicals are consumed or not for this process? The actual chemicals required and used need NOT be reveled, but ONLY the cost and the fact of consuming these additional chemicals DOES need to clearly stated to the public.
      Regards,
      Albert k

  • Curbina

    Many of us would be delighted to be shown by a respected and independent third party that Solar Hydrogen Trends really has what claims to have. But our skepticism is granted, Mr. Avetisian. You have to be aware that we are 25 years later discussing about if “Cold Fusion” is real or not, and this is a forum where many posters (including me) have been following the saga for all that time, and only a fraction of us is leaning to accept the possibility of LENR really being a breakthrough, while most still doubt it.

    That said, and as well built experiments with minimal and controlled sources of error are what can sway any skepticism, at this point I think that the fuel cell demonstration suggested by Mr. McKubre is really a good compromise of costs vs demostrative efficacy. Better if at some point the cell fuel is looped back to keep the Symphony 7 reactor going. I hope you can find an investor willing to finance such a trial. Perhaps if you design a good protocol, with the help of someone that would know how to minimize potential sources of error, and budget what would it cost to perform it, including the publication of a detailed technical report with all the data to be collected, then set up a crowdfunding initiative, you could get to make the demo that would change the perception. Is not easy, I really think that SHT is in a very complicate situation, in much regards similar to what Andrea Rossi had to undergo these last 5 years.

    Now, on a lighter topic, I know the owners of SHT are not native English speakers (nor do I) but due to the unfortunate resemblance of the SHT acronym to the well known 4 letter word, It would be advisable to perhaps perform a name change to the company?

    My Best Regards.

  • Christopher Calder

    mind2matter2reality,

    There are rude people on almost all discussion groups. Just ignore them.

    If you are involved in the company, I have a question for you. The Solar Hydrogen Trends standard size reactor produces too much hydrogen for an automobile to use. Have you calculated the wattage input required to run a car sized reactor? If running your large reactor takes about 400 watts, it seems logical that a smaller reactor would use less power which could easily be supplied by an alternator and small battery. It would seem to me that hooking a reactor up to a vehicle with either an internal combustion engine or a fuel cell would be easy and could be accomplished in a matter of months, not years. Comments?

  • BroKeeper

    The more safe hydrogen energy generated devices available the better we all will be. I do admire SHT’s contribution to this whether it is LENR related or not. So thank you mind2matter2reality for your loyal defense. My apology for any offense taken. Keep up the good work Bro.

    • mind2matter2reality

      No need for apology BroKeeper.
      We are all in this together independent of our current opinions and beliefs.
      History is being made and we are all part of it no matter which side of the fence we are standing.

  • Lande

    Do everyone understand what we are asked to believe in this case?

    1. “0,5 KWhr input electrical energy produce 221 kwhr of Hydrogen gas “

    a. WOW – 440 times more energy out than in ???
    b. Don’t know the physical size of the reactor, but surely the power density and energy density would beat anything else on this planet, including the Rossi invention, where third party test result we hear “could be positive and could be negative”

    2. “Sixteen physical and chemical processes” -“acting simultaneously”
    a. WOW – could we have a few examples please…..
    b. And this time not “cold fusion” but “cold Fission” – of Oxygen as the main LENR event ???
    c. And with no radiation ??

    As everyone knows “Extraordinary claim demands extraordinary proof”.

    So let’s have it: Feed a fuel cell, close the loop, AND produce a huge amount of additional surplus hydrogen.

    • Curbina

      Well, that’s exactly what all the fuss is about.

  • Curbina

    Well, that’s exactly what all the fuss is about.

  • Albert D. Kallal

    I don’t think the issue is that this box produces hydrogen.

    The issue and question is what additional chemicals or substances are consumed
    over time to allow this process to work.

    In other words does the system require natural gas, or say
    sulfuric acid or likely ammonia that would allow such a system to release such
    large amounts of hydrogen. McKubre was right to state that any kind of testing would
    NOT only require independent testing, but also reviling what chemicals or additional
    solutions are being added to the “black box” to promote such a high level of
    production.

    And I dare state that NDA can signed so that testers DO NOT have
    to revel what additional substances are consumed, but AT LEAST STATE that additional
    substances are required and also reveal the cost of such additives and consumables.

    For example there should not be argon if they just splitting water yet even the
    press release and 3rd party data show such substances in the output gas.
    (this suggests that ammonia or calcium carbide is present).

    A clear statement from SHT stating that the 16 processes
    they use does NOT require/consume additional chemicals and the only input is
    water would go a VERY LONG way to clearing up this obfuscated issue.

    So I have no doubt that a 3rd parties can
    verity the output results. However without knowledge or a clear statement as to
    what other substances are consumed and required to sustain this H production,
    then we have little to go on.

    Perhaps additional substances are not required/consumed here ?

    We don’t have any claim or statement from SHT that this reaction
    does not require or consume additional input chemicals to sustain the splitting
    of water. Until this issue is clarified, then reports of hydrogen rates can be
    true and tested by 3rd parties but are WITHOUT MERIT when leaving
    out if additional chemical substances are required/consumed.

    Looking at the output gases there is more then just water
    being consumed since we see argon in the output. And other gases may not been
    tested for.

    I think SHT at least needs to outline the cost and reveal
    if additional substances are being required/consumed.

    • I generally agree with you. Of course, argon is an atmospheric gas and gets into everything. It depends how much is there. They give a cost estimate of production, which is very low and would suggest no additional chemicals used which would drive up the cost. New companies do exaggerate at times. As an example, over time I began to doubt the math of the people at Los Alamos who developed the Green Freedom synthetic fuel process. They want to turn atmospheric CO2 into gasoline, but they mentioned that there would be less profit for the manufacturers than producing oil based gasoline. Thus, I doubted their business math. I think they low-balled costs. The SHT people seem honest and are saying all the right things. Their pattern of behavior does not fit the profile of a scam. That said, we want all the answers before we pop the cork.

      • Albert D. Kallal

        I have no intention of throwing bathwater on what sounds
        like one of the most amazing energy breakthroughs. At the end of the day, if
        their cost numbers on their web site include electricity + chemical costs, then
        my point about some “consumables” existing in this process is MOOT and NOT relevant.

        In other words, the “issue” of additional consumables
        here only matters if they not been included in cost numbers. And I much doubt that some huge “hidden” cost exists since as you well note the people involved
        appear to be credible.

        In fact the only thing holding them back right now is raising
        capital – this technology is in the infant stage and they only somewhat beyond
        the workbench stage. Considering what they have accomplished so far with little
        resources, I see near unlimited possibilities for such a technology.

        This technology has much promise for large scale H
        production and distribution. In fact such energy distribution is what most current
        energy companies do and are best at. In other words existing energy distribution
        companies could well adopt this technology.

        Most interesting is smaller on-site generation
        also seems to be a reasonable possibility. This does not mean everyone would
        make such a choice. For example how many people bother with their own water
        system, or their own generator at home when utility can do a far better job at
        lower cost? Currently some utilities are of course a form of taxation and often
        messed up by market trading and political issues (as a result, utility prices
        have sored in some places not due to costs, but for the wrong reasons).

        So just like water, or gas utilities, this technology seems
        well suited to current utility models for distribution of energy. This technology
        also seems well suited to on-site generation of energy. So just like solar
        panels don’t make sense everywhere, this H production technology allows both
        large and small scale choices based on suitability. If I going camping this
        weekend, I taking a few small canisters of propane to run my stove (or perhaps in the future some small canisters of hydrogen!).

        I will most certainly continue to follow this exciting
        story, and I wish SHT all the success in their endeavors.

        Regards

        Albert k

        • “In fact the only thing holding them back right now is raising
          capital – this technology is in the infant stage” —- If their COP is true, it is ready for production with minor modifications to make the assembly line move quicker. My suspicion is that this device is relatively simple in construction. It would have to be given that the basic discovery was “accidental.” I have emailed Ted Turner, Warren Buffett, George Soros, and Carlos Slim about this development. If you know any other billionaires, I would suggest you email them.

          • bachcole

            Don’t you mean “If you know of any other billionaires”

          • Rather than having the existing millionaires and billionaires get involved and get even richer I would prefer to see many ordinary people invest in the technology and become rich.
            SHT and I are exploring different ideas on making the opportunities available to a larger group of individuals. Hopefully we will have something to present soon.

          • Albert D. Kallal

            Well, the problem with disruptive technologies that many
            existing investments would be hurt. For example, Hotels in Las Vegas LOVE low cost air flights. And of course Airlines love low cost hotels. So both sides attempt to cook up schemes that lowers the value of the given service that helps their bottom line.

            IBM for example now has more developer’s n India then in the
            USA (and they continue to move developer jobs out of the US). And this also explains why IBM is such a big fan of open source software – it lowers that side of the cost question as they tend to have a hardware + leasing model as their lucrative side of business (so they benefit from anything that lowers software development costs). So attempts to “lower” costs on one side of the equation is a common business practice.

            Japan for example purchased and opened coal mines in Canada
            and Australia when such demand was soft. The resulting huge downward pressures in coal prices thus befitted electricity producers in Japan. Keep in mind that Buffet has huge investments in energy related business.

            The same goes for the larger multi-national oil companies
            – they were not responsible for the revolution in hydraulic fracturing, as that would increase supplies of oil rather dramatically as is occurring now.

            So it rather naive to think that many of these wealthily people will adopt investment approaches that will significantly hurt their existing investments. However there are significant portions of the petro
            chemical industry that consume HUGE amounts of hydrogen for hydro cracking of oil – they thus would much benefit from low cost sources of hydrogen used for refining lubricants. And they would also benefit from low oil prices.

            The real problem is such a spectacular source of hydrogen
            gives rise to replacing carbon based fuels altogether, and those that refine oil into lubricants also have significant investments based on high oil prices.

            Given this amazing amount of H production then I don’t
            think SHT will have much difficultly attracting investments.

      • Albert D. Kallal

        As updated, SHT HAS spoken about consumables, and they been VERY forth coming:

        In Symphony 7A, active metal alloy is involved in the oxidation reaction. However, the amount of formed oxide for a one hour period is only 2.1%. During that same time, Symphony 7A produces more than 7 kg of hydrogen, and the share of that chemical reaction is only about 189 grams of hydrogen. If all the hydrogen in Symphony 7A reactor was produced by oxidation – reduction reaction, then in one hour we would spend 97.9 % of all active metal alloy, and the cartridge would have to be replaced practically every hour. This could have become the weak point of our hydrogen reactor. However, in Symphony 7A, the cartridge is replaced once a week, and for the model Symphony 7AM, cartridge replacement will take place once every four weeks.”

        So my bad – they have PUBLIC spoken of this issue!

  • Heath

    We’ve discussed removing the word nuclear from LENR, but perhaps we should request that Solar Hydrogen Trends Incorporated think about its acronym. SHTI or SHT is something I can’t help interpreting in my head as not a good bet. I am interested in their results and 3rd party verification, but good God….

    • Heath,

      “SHTI or SHT is something I can’t help interpreting in my head as not a good bet”.

      Perhaps you should get your head checked. The associations people make tell more about them than about the things that they make the associations on.
      In my head the interpretation of your comment is that you are a juvenile and immature person with a very narrow mind who is stuck on external perceptions rather than the important content. You would probably skip reading a valuable book just because you didn’t like the title.
      Solar Hydrogen Trends is NOT going to change it’s name or the abbreviation that people have assigned to the name.
      Those who have issues with the current abbreviation can use one of these abbreviations which are just as valid.
      SoHy
      SoHyT
      SoHyTrInc
      SoHyTrends
      Take your pick.
      If you are a person of good character you will pick the last one to show that you have good thoughts and positive interpretations in your head.
      Your thoughts are a reflection of your essence and being. Put some effort into developing a good personal philosophy. It will be well worth the effort.

  • Heath

    We’ve discussed removing the word nuclear from LENR, but perhaps we should request that Solar Hydrogen Trends Incorporated think about its acronym. SHTI or SHT is something I can’t help interpreting in my head as not a good bet. I am interested in their results and 3rd party verification, but good God….

    • Heath,

      “SHTI or SHT is something I can’t help interpreting in my head as not a good bet”.

      Perhaps you should get your head checked. The associations people make tell more about them than about the things that they make the associations on.
      In my head the interpretation of your comment is that you are a juvenile and immature person with a very narrow mind who is stuck on external perceptions rather than the important content. You would probably skip reading a valuable book just because you didn’t like the title.
      Solar Hydrogen Trends is NOT going to change it’s name or the abbreviation that people have assigned to the name.
      Those who have issues with the current abbreviation can use one of these abbreviations which are just as valid.
      SoHy
      SoHyT
      SoHyTrInc
      SoHyTrends
      Take your pick.
      If you are a person of good character you will pick the last one to show that you have good thoughts and positive interpretations in your head.
      Your thoughts are a reflection of your essence and being. Put some effort into developing a good personal philosophy. It will be well worth the effort.

  • jousterusa

    As I noted before, Dr. Howard Phillips demonstrated a hydrogen generator that outputs 30 gallons of hydrogen per minute in a talk at my HHO Games Green Technology Expo at the Museum of Science & Industry in Tampa in January. That generator is limited only by the amount of hydrogen it can contain, and is almost infinitely scaleable. There is info about it at hhogames.com. There is no fundraising going on there, only a search for compatible partners who want to develop the device for commercial use. I will be happy to connect interested people to Dr. Phillips if you will contact me at amreporter@aol.games, using the Subject header )in all caps) HHO GAMES.

    • jousterusa,

      Here is a quote from the website you refer to above regarding the hydrogen generator you are advertising.

      “As Dr. Phillips and Patrick Gaddy pointed out, the water necessary to fuel the
      generator can come from the ocean, and the carbon catalyst is abundant and
      cheap. While a substantial quantity of aluminum powder or shavings would be
      required to fuel it, too, the cost would be far less than the conventional cost
      of fueling such a tanker.”

      “Substantial quantity of aluminum powder or shavings would be
      required to fuel it,….”

      It’s no wonder you don’t mention this, any of the power requirements, or the efficiency of the reactor.

      What we have here is deceptive advertising.

      In comparison the Symphony 7A reactor from Solar Hydrogen Trends developed by Dr. Konstantine Balakiryan produces 950 gallons of hydrogen per minute at 97% purity from tap water and 415 watts of input electricity at 150,000% efficiency.

      They have test reports from reputable 3rd party labs attesting to this fact.

      SolarHy has experimented with HHO technology years ago and abandoned it when it developed the Symphony class reactor technology with over-unity performance.

      HHO is yesterday’s technology,

      Symphony reactor is the technology of the future

      Read all about it at:
      http://kochari.info/

  • jousterusa

    As I noted before, Dr. Howard Phillips demonstrated a hydrogen generator that outputs 30 gallons of hydrogen per minute in a talk at my HHO Games Green Technology Expo at the Museum of Science & Industry in Tampa in January. That generator is limited only by the amount of hydrogen it can contain, and is almost infinitely scaleable. There is info about it at hhogames.com. There is no fundraising going on there, only a search for compatible partners who want to develop the device for commercial use. I will be happy to connect interested people to Dr. Phillips if you will contact me at amreporter@aol.games, using the Subject header )in all caps) HHO GAMES.

    • jousterusa,

      Here is a quote from the website you refer to above regarding the hydrogen generator you are advertising.

      “As Dr. Phillips and Patrick Gaddy pointed out, the water necessary to fuel the
      generator can come from the ocean, and the carbon catalyst is abundant and
      cheap. While a substantial quantity of aluminum powder or shavings would be
      required to fuel it, too, the cost would be far less than the conventional cost
      of fueling such a tanker.”

      “Substantial quantity of aluminum powder or shavings would be
      required to fuel it,….”

      It’s no wonder you don’t mention this, any of the power requirements, or the efficiency of the reactor.

      What we have here is deceptive advertising.

      In comparison the Symphony 7A reactor from Solar Hydrogen Trends developed by Dr. Konstantine Balakiryan produces 950 gallons of hydrogen per minute at 97% purity from tap water and 415 watts of input electricity at 150,000% efficiency.

      They have test reports from reputable 3rd party labs attesting to this fact.

      SolarHy has experimented with HHO technology years ago and abandoned it when it developed the Symphony class reactor technology with over-unity performance.

      HHO is yesterday’s technology,

      Symphony reactor is the technology of the future

      Read all about it at:
      http://kochari.info/