MFMP Publishes Statement from US Naval Research Laboratory Source on LENR

Thanks to Bob Greenyer for sharing that the Martin Fleischmann Memorial Project has received a statement from an unnamed source at the Naval Research Labs regarding LENR research. The statement has been posted in full on the MFMPs Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/MartinFleischmannMemorialProject/posts/1051219568242075

Here is an excerpt:

“The heat is real and not an instrumental artefact, (such as a calorimetry error), or due to stored energy.

“However, we struggled for years to determine if the heat is due to LENR or a very specific instrumental artefact – a short to ground in a certain wire with a certain resistance for the short.”

“This specific artefact could explain all the data (except for Eve). To cause this short spontaneously is possible if the wire was in a certain place and vibration causes the wire to touch, un-touch, re-touch, etc. The resistance must be a certain amount only or the effect observed would be different. Any other wire, we would have had diagnostics present to detect that kind of artefact. Did it occur? Who knows. We have no evidence for or against (and we tried in every way the data will allow). We have not seen excess heat, unambiguously, since this series and have stopped doing LENR work.”

So this source is saying that although they measured was unambiguous excess heat, there was a chance that a certain kind of short could have produced the effect, although they never found that short. And in the case of Eve (which Louis DeChiaro stated was the successful replication of Pons and Fleischmann effect, another kind of short would be required — and they have evidence that it did not.

This source obviously doesn’t want to be definitive about LENR replication, but is suggesting strongly that it happened. Now that the Naval Research Labs have stopped doing LENR research it will not be possible to re-analyze their experiments — but Dr. DeChiaro’s analysis published here yesterday does give a number of pointers that could be helpful for further research.

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