E-Cat Photo with Observations, Comments (John Page)

The following photograph with some comments based on basic conclusions was submitted by John Page.

I think it’s worth noting that Andrea Rossi has said that this picture was taken during the manufacturing of the E-Cat plant, before it was completed, and that “The plant is much more complex than appears in the photos”, and that “many hi-tech parts are missing in the photo.”

ecat+MW1-USA+just+some+comments - Copy

  • Daniel Maris

    V. helpful. Will be interesting to see other comments.

    May I suggest if people want to refer to the pic we divide the pic into 16 rectangles with four equal divsions on the vertical and horizontal axes…and that we number the vertical axis A (starting at the top), B, C , and D and the horizontal axis 1 (starting on the left), 2, 3 and 4. Might help!

  • Andreas Moraitis

    On the lower part of the rightmost, vertical pipe seems to be written “condensate”. So this might be the return path.

  • wpj

    The pipe on the right is highly lagged (the white stuff with metal straps) and it has the word “condensate” that can be seen between the rungs of the steps so does not appear to be a feed.

  • Andreas Moraitis

    On the lower part of the rightmost, vertical pipe seems to be written “condensate”. So this might be the return path.

  • Jimr

    The upper pipe on the left as well as the horizontal pipe at the far end are listed as steam. I’m confused as the upper pipe on the right appears the same as the pipe on the left and the vertical listed as confiscate as opposed to steam?

    • Steve H

      It’s Condensate – steam droplets condensed back into water.

      • Jimr

        Yes I tried to correct it but went into review, spell correction messed me up.

  • Jimr

    The upper pipe on the left as well as the horizontal pipe at the far end are listed as steam. I’m confused as the upper pipe on the right appears the same as the pipe on the left and the vertical listed as confiscate as opposed to steam?

    • Jimr

      Spell correction screwed me, condensate not confiscate.

    • Jimr

      Spelling correction messed me up, condensate not confiscate

      • Steve H

        No probs – I’ve been there!

    • Steve H

      It’s Condensate – steam droplets condensed back into water.

      • Jimr

        Yes I tried to correct it but went into review, spell correction messed me up.

  • Steve H

    From a different photo it looks as if the red units are programmable mass flow controllers. Feeding water into each reactor. Three per blue box.
    These units will be able to individually control and measure the mass of water feeding each reactor core. They can be tuned for three term control, which means they predict and allow for large instabilities on a core by core basis.
    Every one could theoretically be custom tuned which means that a different recipe of Nickel charge could be allowed for with only minor modifications.
    The tuning could be monitored and adjusted from the other side of the world – if necessary.
    The guy in front has his laptop plugged into an Ethernet communications unit. The blue loops are CAT 5 Ethernet patch cables.
    This would theoretically allow for massive amounts of data to be sent anywhere in the world in real time and also be controlled from that location – using correct authentication and protocols of course.

    • Gerard McEk

      The most likely purpose of that switch or hub with the blue cables is to gather data from each individual PLC controlling each E-cat. That switch is connected to the SCADA system which collects all data and will be used to connect to the outside world to monitor and adjust the whole unit. I cannot identify these individual PLC’s on this picture though. It could also be that one PLC controls more than one E-cat.

      • Steve H

        Totally agree.
        There should be a PLC rack with power supply, processor and I/O modules connected to the mass flow controllers, thermocouples, solenoids etc.
        There are also a number of manual isolation valves – probably to allow isolation and removal/refitting of components without having to shutdown the entire unit..

  • Steve H

    From a different photo it looks as if the red units are programmable mass flow controllers. Feeding water into each reactor. Three per blue box.
    These units will be able to individually control and measure the mass of water feeding each reactor core. They can be tuned for three term control, which means they predict and allow for large instabilities on a core by core basis.
    Every one could theoretically be custom tuned which means that a different recipe of Nickel charge could be allowed for with only minor modifications.
    The tuning could be monitored and adjusted from the other side of the world – if necessary.
    The guy in front has his laptop plugged into an Ethernet communications unit. The blue loops are CAT 5 Ethernet patch cables.
    This would theoretically allow for massive amounts of data to be sent anywhere in the world in real time and also be controlled from that location – using correct authentication and protocols of course.

    • Gerard McEk

      The most likely purpose of that switch or hub with the blue cables is to gather data from each individual PLC controlling each E-cat. That switch is connected to the SCADA system which collects all data and will be used to connect to the outside world to monitor and adjust the whole unit. I cannot identify these individual PLC’s on this picture though. It could also be that one PLC controls more than one E-cat.

      • Steve H

        Totally agree.
        There should be a PLC rack with power supply, processor and I/O modules connected to the mass flow controllers, thermocouples, solenoids etc.
        There are also a number of manual isolation valves – probably to allow isolation and removal/refitting of components without having to shutdown the entire unit..

  • Steve H

    The white tubes, are pipe sections which are thermally insulated with pre-formed rock-wool – wrapped and smeared with a white sealing paste.

  • Steve H

    The white tubes, are pipe sections which are thermally insulated with pre-formed rock-wool – wrapped and smeared with a white sealing paste.

  • Andreas Moraitis

    What’s the strange white object between the blue cables and the knees of the man in the foreground?

    • Andreas Moraitis

      Apparently, it’s just one of the pipes which is partly covered by the trouser leg…

      • Seems like at least two separate rooms. The main Ecat hardware one (like in the photo above) and the photo of Andrea have brown floors, then there seems a software room (where Cindy and Wendy are) with grey floors. The red wall shown with the Ecat logo is very rectangular in construction unlike all of the other walls which have an angular construction. My guess is the cramped, brown floor photos are the inside of a portable shipping container that have nothing to do with the red walled unit. Perhaps the most of the computers are to be kept in another unit out side of the brown floored one.

      • Ophelia Rump

        , or a roll of paper towels.

  • Andreas Moraitis

    What’s the strange white object between the blue cables and the knees of the man in the foreground?

    • Andreas Moraitis

      Apparently, it’s just one of the pipes which is partly covered by the trouser leg…

      • Ophelia Rump

        Or an extra large roll of paper towels. ;<}

  • Not bad for a hoax 😉

  • Not bad for a hoax 😉

    • Anonymous

      It’s obviously all photoshopped. 😉

  • Seems like at least two separate rooms. The main Ecat hardware one (like in the photo above) and the photo of Andrea have brown floors, then there seems a software room (where Cindy and Wendy are) with grey floors. The red wall shown with the Ecat logo is very rectangular in construction unlike all of the other walls which have an angular construction. My guess is the cramped, brown floor photos are the inside of a portable shipping container that have nothing to do with the red walled unit. Perhaps most of the computers are to be kept in another unit out side of the brown floored one.

  • Steve H

    No probs – I’ve been there!

  • WaltC

    Just a general comment– but it doesn’t seem at all that this current plant design would work for hot e-cats. High pressure, high temperature steam, would rupture all those pipes and fittings (in my inexpert opinion– my background is EE & Software).

    • Steve H

      Yes. Probably rated at 150 psi. These are photo’s of old tech E-Cats (imo).

    • Omega Z

      This is the Low temp E-cats. The reactor doesn’t exceed 200’C & the output steam is about 120’C at less then 2 Bars of pressure.

  • builditnow

    Excellent idea to notate the pictures and discover what we can see.
    One comment, the vertical pipes noted with “surprising they are not insulated” are fat because they have a thick layer of insulation wrapped around them, you can see it clamped on at the top, there is a thinner pipe in the middle.

  • builditnow

    Excellent idea to notate the pictures and discover what we can see.
    One comment, the vertical pipes noted with “surprising they are not insulated” are fat because they have a thick layer of insulation wrapped around them, you can see it clamped on at the top, there is a thinner pipe in the middle.

    • Paul Zigouras

      The only fat thing in this picture are the four people working on it. I do, however, believe that they are indeed servicing it… because those guys could not possibly be professional actors.

  • Steve H

    Yes. Probably rated at 150 psi. These are photo’s of old tech E-Cats (imo).

  • Omega Z

    This is the Low temp E-cats. The reactor doesn’t exceed 200’C & the output steam is about 120’C at less then 2 Bars of pressure.