Cavitation Energy Systems Claims More Efficient Way to Produce Steam

There’s an interesting thread on the Vortex-l list started by Nigel Dyer who has been working with a company called Cavitation Energy Systems (http://cavitationenergysystems.com/) who claim to have developed a new efficient way of producing steam using cavitation.

On their website they describe their system which is built on the idea that the crushing of cavitation bubbles creates heat in an efficient way. Details are described on the company’s website here: http://cavitationenergysystems.com/overview.cfm

A provisional http://www.cavitationenergysystems.com/assets/pdfs/69935PVCavitation%20engine-patent.pdf

Nigel Dyer states in his post: “What is not obvious until you start going through the details of what they say on the website is that there appears to be five times more energy in the steam they produce than the electrical energy they use to produce it.”

He writes:

* As they intended, they use a diesel injector to create a pulse of
water that is full of cavitation bubbles.
* When the pulse hits a nearby surface a shock wave travels back
through the water initiating an almost synchronous collapse of all
the bubbles.
* The potential differences within the collapsing bubbles accelerate
some free protons such that they have an energy of the order of
10kV, enough to overcome the coulomb barrier and initiate fusion.
* The fusion energy is carried away by a virtual neutrino, and there
is a cascade of virtual neutrinos which distribute the energy as
kinetic energy among nearby protons and electrons. Some of the
protons have sufficient energy to initiate a secondary fusion event
starting a short duration chain reaction. With others the kinetic
energy they gain is transferred to the water molecule and
consequently the water is heated up until it boils.

In addition to his blog post, Dyer has written a more detailed analysis titled “On the possibility of hydroelectric fusion: The evidence from the CES steam generator “http://thedyers.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/CES_LENR.pdf

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